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Unfortunately this attitude leads to problems having problems. For example, a “Small white fluffy” off lead runs over and instigates a fight with a big dog, the big dog responds with body language that says “leave me alone” and suddenly the councils are pointing their fingers at the big dogs because the little dogs couldn’t possible have hurt the big dogs. This is an on-going issue I could live personally without.

 

Nutrition wise, your puppy has been given the complete dining experience, with premium dog food, superfoods and plenty of supplements for everything else! To help ease your puppy in its new environment, try and wean it from it’s current diet on to your chosen diet. As an ethical breeder I’m happy to give you a small bag of their current dog biscuits to help you wean your new puppy, I’d recommend you mix this with cheap oats from the supermarket, as they are a great superfood that can cheaply bulk up your growing pups meals as a very healthy option! Also recommended is mixing in a green superfood mix, like Spirulina. it’s a great alkalizing food for all animals, so if it’s not currently in your diet, I highly recommend adding it! Lastly add in cheap fatty supermarket mince to your puppies meal and they’re good to ‘chow down’.

 

You should be feeding your puppy these meals 2-3 times per day,  once when you wake, one in the afternoon and one before bed.

 

When you feed them, only leave the food down for a maximum of 15 minutes (unless they are still eating it) however, after the 15 minutes, when they leave it, take the food away. This will help encourage their survival instincts and will ensure they don’t become fussy eaters. Eventually when they are older you will only need to feed them one big meal once every 24 hours.

 

Socialization should be an on-going activity for at least the first 6 months of your puppies life. Everytime you leave the house, your pup should be in the car at least, getting used to being on the move and always experiencing new things.

The first week with your new dobermann puppy.

So, you’ve gained a cute new family member, for a second put yourself in their shoes, they’ve just left everything they’ve known, mum, dad and the company of their brothers and sisters, and have now been ‘plonked’ into a whole new world. They will generally be fine when you’re distracting them with countless cuddles and hugs, however when it comes time to leave them on their own, they’ll cover up their cuteness with a barrage of screams and crying, which may leave you thinking that ‘something is wrong with my new pup’. This is completely normal and they need to get it out of their system. This is just a small phase, which eases after a few days if you follow this simple rule: Ignore them completely until they have calmed down for at least 5 minutes (if you’re in a rush to go somewhere and can’t wait, just wait until an appropriate break in crying occurs).

 

You may choose to let them get over things faster by letting them see you whilst they are screaming and tantruming, it may be even giving you a bit of a headache, just remember they will be giving you years of love and protection down the track! You will have to keep on ignoring them as if they are not even there.

 

When night time comes, thing’s won’t change here, so what I recommend to make things easiest is to get a crate and leave them at the furthest end of the house in the laundry where you are least likely to hear your little puppy cry, if you don’t have a crate don’t worry, but it will make things easier for your puppy and also lower the chances over ‘overnight accidents’.

 

I highly recommend not leaving them outside, as it may cause issues with your neighbours, and you’ll be likely to still hear them pretty loudly. If you’re having problems, try sleeping with earplugs as it takes the edge off, remembering again that this is only a short phase that all puppies will go through.

 

I’ve even seen issues where neighbours were going to call the RSPCA because the puppy had separation anxiety. Simply because the neighbour had absolutely no idea. She just heard a puppy screaming and thought it needed to be pampered and bought in.

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